The moderating effect of subjective norm in predicting intention to use urban green spaces: a study of Hong Kong

Wan, C. ORCID: 0000-0001-5750-0610, Shen, G.Q. and Choi, S., 2018. The moderating effect of subjective norm in predicting intention to use urban green spaces: a study of Hong Kong. Sustainable Cities and Society, 37, pp. 288-297. ISSN 2210-6707

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Abstract

People living in urban areas are encouraged to use urban green spaces (UGS) because of the physical, psychological and social benefits offered by the green environment to city dwellers. Prior studies have investigated the physical, socio-psychological and demographic factors in explaining the use of UGS; however, the moderating effect of social influence has rarely been examined. Based on the theory of planned behaviour, a model extending the predictors of behavioural intention was proposed in this study. Data were collected by a telephone survey conducted in Hong Kong. The results revealed that attitude, subjective norm, perceived behavioural control, and usefulness positively influence people’s intention of using urban green areas. It was also proved that the interaction terms of usefulness and subjective norm, and perceived quality and subjective norm, negatively influence behavioural intention. Insightful implications for studying UGS behaviour, suggestions for urban planning and promotion of using urban green spaces are discussed.

Item Type: Journal article
Publication Title: Sustainable Cities and Society
Creators: Wan, C., Shen, G.Q. and Choi, S.
Publisher: Elsevier BV
Date: February 2018
Volume: 37
ISSN: 2210-6707
Identifiers:
NumberType
10.1016/j.scs.2017.11.022DOI
1404365Other
Divisions: Schools > Nottingham Business School
Record created by: Laura Ward
Date Added: 17 May 2021 14:54
Last Modified: 31 May 2021 15:03
URI: http://irep.ntu.ac.uk/id/eprint/42879

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