Effects of 1 year of lifestyle intervention on institutionalized older adults

Magistro, D. ORCID: 0000-0002-2554-3701, Carlevaro, F., Magno, F., Simon, M., Camp, N., Kinrade, N. ORCID: 0000-0001-6370-4628, Zecca, M. and Musella, G., 2021. Effects of 1 year of lifestyle intervention on institutionalized older adults. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 18 (14): 7612. ISSN 1661-7827

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Abstract

The socio-economic and health consequences of our ageing population are well documented, with older adults living in long-term care facilities amongst the frailest possessing specific and significant healthcare and social care needs. These needs may be exacerbated through the sedentary behaviour which is prevalent within care home settings. Reducing sedentary time can reduce the risk of many diseases and improve functional health, implying that improvements in health may be gained by simply helping older adults substitute time spent sitting with time spent standing or in light-intensity ambulation. This study identified the impact of 1 year of lifestyle intervention in a group of older adults living in a long-term care setting in Italy. One hundred and eleven older adults (mean age, 82.37 years; SD = 10.55 years) participated in the study. Sixty-nine older adults were in the intervention group (35 without severe cognitive decline and 34 with dementia) and 42 older adults were in the control group. Data on physical functioning, basic activities of daily living (BADL) and mood were collected 4 times, before, during (every four months) and after the 1 year of intervention. The lifestyle intervention focused on improving the amount of time spent every week in active behaviour and physical activity (minimum 150 min of weekly activities). All participants completed the training program and no adverse events, related to the program, occurred. The intervention group showed steady and significant improvements in physical functioning and a stable situation in BADL and mood following the intervention in older adults with and without dementia, whilst the control group exhibited a significant decline over time. These results suggest that engagement in a physical activity intervention may benefit care home residents with and without dementia both physically and mentally, leading to improved social care and a reduced burden on healthcare services.

Item Type: Journal article
Publication Title: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
Creators: Magistro, D., Carlevaro, F., Magno, F., Simon, M., Camp, N., Kinrade, N., Zecca, M. and Musella, G.
Publisher: MDPI AG
Date: 2021
Volume: 18
Number: 14
ISSN: 1661-7827
Identifiers:
NumberType
10.3390/ijerph18147612DOI
1453482Other
Rights: Copyright: © 2021 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).
Divisions: Schools > School of Science and Technology
Record created by: Linda Sullivan
Date Added: 21 Jul 2021 10:23
Last Modified: 21 Jul 2021 10:23
URI: http://irep.ntu.ac.uk/id/eprint/43590

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