Mental health and other factors associated with work productivity post injury in the UK: multicentre cohort study

Kellezi, B. ORCID: 0000-0003-4825-3624, Dhiman, P., Coupland, C., Whitehead, J., Morriss, R., Joseph, S., Beckett, K., Sleney, J., Barnes, J. and Kendrick, D., 2021. Mental health and other factors associated with work productivity post injury in the UK: multicentre cohort study. Injury Prevention. ISSN 1353-8047

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Abstract

Introduction: Mental health conditions are a major contributor to productivity loss and are common post-injury. This study quantifies post-injury productivity loss and its association with pre and post-injury mental health, injury, demographic, health, social and other factors.

Methods: Multi-centre, longitudinal study recruiting hospitalised 16-69-year-old employed individuals with unintentional injuries, followed-up at 1,2,4 and 12 months. Participants completed questionnaires on injury, demographic factors, health (including mental health), social factors, other factors and on-the-job productivity upon return to work (RTW). Odds ratios were estimated for above median productivity loss, using random effects logistic regression.

Results: 217 adults had made a RTW at 2,4 or 12-months post-injury: 29% at 2-months, 66% at 4-months, and 83% at 12-months. Productivity loss reduced over time: 3.3% of working time at 2-months, 1.7% at 4-months, 1% at 12-months. Significantly higher productivity loss was associated with pre-injury psychiatric conditions (OR 21.40, 95% CI: 3.50, 130.78) and posttraumatic stress avoidance symptoms at 1-month (OR for one-unit increase in score 1.15, 95%CI 1.07, 1.22). Significantly lower productivity loss was associated with male gender (OR 0.32, 95%CI 0.14, 0.74), upper and lower limb injuries (vs other body regions, OR 0.15, 95% CI: 0.03, 0.81), and sports injuries (vs. home, OR 0.18, 95% CI: 0.04, 0.78). Pre-injury psychiatric conditions and gender remained significant in analysis of multiply imputed data.

Conclusions: Unintentional injury results in substantial productivity loss. Those with pre-injury psychiatric conditions, females and posttraumatic stress avoidance symptoms experience greater productivity loss and may require additional support to successfully RTW.

Item Type: Journal article
Publication Title: Injury Prevention
Creators: Kellezi, B., Dhiman, P., Coupland, C., Whitehead, J., Morriss, R., Joseph, S., Beckett, K., Sleney, J., Barnes, J. and Kendrick, D.
Publisher: BMJ Publishing Group
Date: 30 August 2021
ISSN: 1353-8047
Identifiers:
NumberType
10.1136/injuryprev-2021-044311DOI
1455842Other
Divisions: Schools > School of Social Sciences
Record created by: Laura Ward
Date Added: 04 Aug 2021 08:14
Last Modified: 03 Sep 2021 10:43
URI: http://irep.ntu.ac.uk/id/eprint/43779

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