Factors affecting Pakistani young adults’ intentions to uptake COVID‐19 vaccination: an extension of the theory of planned behavior

Ullah, I., Lin, C., Malik, N.I., Wu, T., Araban, M., Griffiths, M.D. ORCID: 0000-0001-8880-6524 and Pakpour, A.H., 2021. Factors affecting Pakistani young adults’ intentions to uptake COVID‐19 vaccination: an extension of the theory of planned behavior. Brain and Behavior: e2370. ISSN 2162-3279

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Abstract

Introduction: Aside from personal beliefs, young adults’ intention to uptake the COVID-19 vaccine can be influenced by their fear of COVID-19 and perceived infectability of COVID-19. The present study incorporated fear of COVID-19 and perceived infectability with the theory of planned behavior (TPB) to form an expanded TPB to analyze factors affecting Pakistani young adults’ intentions to uptake the COVID-vaccine in Pakistan.

Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted and recruited participants from Pakistani social media users. The proposed extended TPB model was examined by using structural equation modeling.

Results: A total of 1034 individuals replied to the survey. The three factors of the original theory of planned behavior and the fear of COVID-19 were positively related to their intention to uptake COVID-19 vaccination (r = 0.25-0.66). Moreover, the perceived infectability positively influenced the three theories of planned behavioral factors and the fear of COVID-19 (r = 0.27-0.60), also affecting the participants’ intentions to uptake COVID-19 vaccination.

Conclusions: Perceived infectability was positively related to the participants’ intentions to uptake COVID-19 vaccination, and perceived behavioral control was the strongest mediator. More evidence-based information concerning treatments and COVID-19 vaccination are needed to encourage individuals to uptake the vaccine.

Item Type: Journal article
Publication Title: Brain and Behavior
Creators: Ullah, I., Lin, C., Malik, N.I., Wu, T., Araban, M., Griffiths, M.D. and Pakpour, A.H.
Publisher: Wiley
Date: 20 September 2021
ISSN: 2162-3279
Identifiers:
NumberType
10.1002/brb3.2370DOI
1472938Other
Rights: © 2021 The Authors. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Divisions: Schools > School of Social Sciences
Record created by: Jeremy Silvester
Date Added: 23 Sep 2021 08:40
Last Modified: 23 Sep 2021 08:40
URI: http://irep.ntu.ac.uk/id/eprint/44236

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