Editorial: Where does the field of gaming addiction studies need to go next?

Gkasionis, I., Kuss, D.J. ORCID: 0000-0001-8917-782X and Griffiths, M.D. ORCID: 0000-0001-8880-6524, 2021. Editorial: Where does the field of gaming addiction studies need to go next? Journal of Concurrent Disorders, 3 (3), pp. 187-192. ISSN 2562-7546

[img]
Preview
Text
1473212_Griffiths.pdf - Published version

Download (209kB) | Preview

Abstract

Problematic gaming has been considered an issue of mental health (e.g., addiction) and 'Gaming Disorder' has been formally recognized in the 11th revision of the International Classification of Disease. This editorial argues that now is perhaps a good time to shift the focus from 'disorder' to 'gaming'. Learning about the practice of gaming more holistically is one way to refine and extend attained knowledge in terms of our understanding of problematic gaming. A key aspect of gaming that needs to be explored is the current state of gaming, which can more likely be addressed from a game studies perspective as opposed to a purely psychological perspective. This editorial posits a number of key questions and approaches which could take the gaming addiction field forward from a more interdisciplinary perspective.

Item Type: Journal article
Publication Title: Journal of Concurrent Disorders
Creators: Gkasionis, I., Kuss, D.J. and Griffiths, M.D.
Publisher: Concurrent Disorders Society
Date: 31 August 2021
Volume: 3
Number: 3
ISSN: 2562-7546
Identifiers:
NumberType
1473212Other
Rights: ©20201 Gkasionis, I., Kuss, D.J. & Griffiths, M.D. This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license (http://creativecommons. org/licenses/by/4.0/)
Divisions: Schools > School of Social Sciences
Record created by: Jeremy Silvester
Date Added: 24 Sep 2021 16:19
Last Modified: 24 Sep 2021 16:25
URI: http://irep.ntu.ac.uk/id/eprint/44255

Actions (login required)

Edit View Edit View

Views

Views per month over past year

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year