Warm-up intensity does not affect the ergogenic effect of sodium bicarbonate in adult men

Jones, R.L. ORCID: 0000-0001-9657-9448, Stellingwerff, T., Swinton, P., Artioli, G.G. ORCID: 0000-0001-8463-2213, Saunders, B. and Sale, C. ORCID: 0000-0002-5816-4169, 2021. Warm-up intensity does not affect the ergogenic effect of sodium bicarbonate in adult men. International Journal of Sport Nutrition and Exercise Metabolism. ISSN 1526-484X

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Abstract

This study determined the influence of a high- (HI) versus low-intensity (LI) cycling warm-up on blood acid-base responses and exercise capacity following ingestion of sodium bicarbonate (SB; 0.3 g/kg body mass) or a placebo (PLA; maltodextrin) 3 hr prior to warm-up. Twelve men (21 ± 2 years, 79.2 ± 3.6 kg body mass, and maximum power output [Wmax] 318 ± 36 W) completed a familiarization and four double-blind trials in a counterbalanced order: HI warm-up with SB, HI warm-up with PLA, LI warm-up with SB, and LI warm-up with PLA. LI warm-up was 15 min at 60% Wmax, while the HI warm-up (typical of elites) featured LI followed by 2 × 30 s (3-min break) at Wmax, finishing 30 min prior to a cycling capacity test at 110% Wmax. Blood bicarbonate and lactate were measured throughout. SB supplementation increased blood bicarbonate (+6.4 mmol/L; 95% confidence interval, CI [5.7, 7.1]) prior to greater reductions with HI warm-up (-3.8 mmol/L; 95% CI [-5.8, -1.8]). However, during the 30-min recovery, blood bicarbonate rebounded and increased in all conditions, with concentrations ∼5.3 mmol/L greater with SB supplementation (p < .001). Blood bicarbonate significantly declined during the cycling capacity test at 110%Wmax with greater reductions following SB supplementation (-2.4 mmol/L; 95% CI [-3.8, -0.90]). Aligned with these results, SB supplementation increased total work done during the cycling capacity test at 110% Wmax (+8.5 kJ; 95% CI [3.6, 13.4], ∼19% increase) with no significant main effect of warm-up intensity (+0.0 kJ; 95% CI [-5.0, 5.0]). Collectively, the results demonstrate that SB supplementation can improve HI cycling capacity irrespective of prior warm-up intensity, likely due to blood alkalosis.

Item Type: Journal article
Publication Title: International Journal of Sport Nutrition and Exercise Metabolism
Creators: Jones, R.L., Stellingwerff, T., Swinton, P., Artioli, G.G., Saunders, B. and Sale, C.
Publisher: Human Kinetics
Date: 3 September 2021
ISSN: 1526-484X
Identifiers:
NumberType
10.1123/ijsnem.2021-0076DOI
1473049Other
Rights: © 2021 Human Kinetics, Inc. All material contained within the Human Kinetics Web site is protected by copyright. All Rights Reserved and are protected to the fullest extend of United States and International copyright laws. Except for use in a review or for the purposes of aiding in placing an order with Human Kinetics, the reproduction or utilization of this work in any form or by any electronic, mechanical, or other means, now known or hereafter invented, including xerography, photocopying, broadcast and recording, and in any information storage and retrieval system, is forbidden without the written permission of the publisher. Order forms may be copied for the purpose of ordering materials from Human Kinetics. Read the Human Kinetics Permission Information page for information about how to obtain permission to reproduce or utilize materials on the Web site.
Divisions: Schools > School of Science and Technology
Record created by: Linda Sullivan
Date Added: 27 Sep 2021 15:41
Last Modified: 27 Sep 2021 15:41
URI: http://irep.ntu.ac.uk/id/eprint/44271

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