Exploring the enablers and impact of internalized HIV stigma among Black Sub-Sahara African (BSSA) men in the East Midlands region, UK

Mandebvu, A., Nyashanu, M. ORCID: 0000-0002-9231-0393, Ekpenyong, and Damilola, O., 2020. Exploring the enablers and impact of internalized HIV stigma among Black Sub-Sahara African (BSSA) men in the East Midlands region, UK. International Journal of HIV and AIDS Research, 3 (1).

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Abstract

Background: Black Sub-Sahara African (BSSA) population are disproportionately affected by HIV compared with the total UK population. The latest data shows an increase in HIV public health authorities to engage with these communities to combat the spread of HIV infection in their community and the wider population infections among BSSA communities. It is therefore important for public health authorities to engage with these communities to combat the spread of HIV infection in their community and the wider population. This research aim is to explore the impact of internalised HIV stigma (IHS) among BSSA men in Nottingham. A more evidence-based approach in dealing with sexual health issues of the BSSA community is therefore needed.

Methods: The silences framework and hegemonic masculinity theories were adopted as guiding theoretical frameworks for this study. The Silences Framework neither helps to understand that reality is never objective nor fixed, but rather subjective, and human beings define their social world from their lived experiences. Hegemonic Masculinity, it is used in this research to explain health issues relating to men. It seeks to establish the fact that men, in general, are in denial about their health-seeking behaviours.

Results: The study found that perceived HIV stigma, blame through ignorance, religion, gender and culture competency were enablers of internalised HIV stigma among BSSA men. These HIV stigma enablers also impacted the BSSA men s’ sexual health seeking behaviour.

Conclusion: There is a need to engage with BSSA men and support them to mitigate the enablers and impact of internalised HIV stigma. Such an initiative can increase the uptake of sexual health and HIV services among BSSA men whose reception to sexual health and HIV messages has been reported as low.

Item Type: Journal article
Publication Title: International Journal of HIV and AIDS Research
Creators: Mandebvu, A., Nyashanu, M., Ekpenyong, and Damilola, O.
Publisher: Pulsus
Date: 17 April 2020
Volume: 3
Number: 1
Identifiers:
NumberType
1472693Other
Rights: This open-access article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (CC BY-NC) (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/), which permits reuse, distribution and reproduction of the article, provided that the original work is properly cited and the reuse is restricted to noncommercial purposes. For commercial reuse, contact reprints@pulsus.com
Divisions: Schools > School of Social Sciences
Record created by: Laura Ward
Date Added: 30 Sep 2021 14:34
Last Modified: 30 Sep 2021 14:34
URI: http://irep.ntu.ac.uk/id/eprint/44295

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