Male coalitions and female behaviour affect male mating success independent of dominance rank and female receptive synchrony in wild Barbary macaques

Young, C. ORCID: 0000-0001-8919-2093, Hähndel, S., Majolo, B., Schülke, O. and Ostner, J., 2013. Male coalitions and female behaviour affect male mating success independent of dominance rank and female receptive synchrony in wild Barbary macaques. Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology, 67 (10), pp. 1665-1677. ISSN 0340-5443

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Abstract

Dominant mammalian males should gain a reproductive advantage due to their greater fighting abilities. However, the extent to which they can monopolise access to females varies across species. In primates and recently other mammalian species, the Priority of Access (PoA) model is commonly used to measure the degree to which male rank and female receptive synchrony affect mating skew. Few studies have examined the factors which lead to deviations from the expectations of the model. Here, we investigate male mating skew in wild Barbary macaques (Macaca sylvanus). We examined four of the main factors which affect male mating success: the roles of male rank, female receptive synchrony, coalitionary activity and female behaviour. We found that male mating was skewed up the hierarchy, but there was a large deviation from the PoA model's expectations with high-ranked males not gaining as big a share as expected. Females frequently initiated sexual encounters, predominantly with mid-ranked males, increasing their mating success. Male coalitionary activity independently increased mating success. Frequent associations with females were costly to males as they were the targets of bridging coalitions, decreasing future mating opportunities for the targets. High-ranking males did not increase their mating success directly through bridging coalitions but acted to dilute the effects of female behaviour. By examining different factors affecting mating skew, we are able to show that alternative male and female mating strategies are effective in reducing the monopolisation potential of the dominant male.

Item Type: Journal article
Publication Title: Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology
Creators: Young, C., Hähndel, S., Majolo, B., Schülke, O. and Ostner, J.
Publisher: Springer Science and Business Media LLC
Date: October 2013
Volume: 67
Number: 10
ISSN: 0340-5443
Identifiers:
NumberType
10.1007/s00265-013-1577-7DOI
1483555Other
Rights: © Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2013.
Divisions: Schools > School of Social Sciences
Record created by: Linda Sullivan
Date Added: 01 Nov 2021 10:49
Last Modified: 01 Nov 2021 10:49
URI: http://irep.ntu.ac.uk/id/eprint/44557

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