Relationship between gaming disorder, self-compensation motivation, game flow, time spent gaming, and fear of missing out among a sample of Chinese university students: a network analysis

Li, L., Niu, Z., Griffiths, M.D. ORCID: 0000-0001-8880-6524 and Mei, S., 2021. Relationship between gaming disorder, self-compensation motivation, game flow, time spent gaming, and fear of missing out among a sample of Chinese university students: a network analysis. Frontiers in Psychiatry, 12: 761519. ISSN 1664-0640

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Abstract

Background and Aims: In previous correlational research, the relationship between gaming disorder (GD), compensation motivation, game flow, time spent gaming, and fear of missing out (FoMO) has been examined. However, network analysis has rarely been applied to explore the relationship between GD, self-compensation motivation, game flow, time spent gaming, and FoMO. Therefore, the present study used network analysis to examine the relationship between the aforementioned variables among a sample of gamers.

Methods: The present study comprised gamers (N = 1,635) recruited from three Chinese universities, who completed an online survey including the Gaming Disorder Test, Self-Compensation Motivation Questionnaire, Game Flow Questionnaire, and Trait-State Fear of Missing Out Scale, as well as four items related to time spent gaming.

Results: Self-compensation motivation, game flow, time spent gaming, and FoMO were all significantly and positively associated with GD. In the domain-level and facet-level networks, weekday gaming hours and weekend gaming hours had the strongest edge intensity. The domain-level, facet-level, and item-level networks analysis also showed that GD was connected with self-compensation motivation, game flow, time spent gaming, and FoMO. The network structure demonstrated a significant difference between males and females (2.33 vs. 2.81, p = 0.001) using the domain-level network comparison test (NCT).

Conclusions: The results suggest that GD is closely associated with self-compensation motivation, game flow, time spent gaming, and FoMO. FoMO and gaming motivation (i.e., self-compensation and game flow) may increase time spent gaming and facilitate GD. Therefore, interventions that decrease game immersion and time spent gaming are likely to decrease GD.

Item Type: Journal article
Publication Title: Frontiers in Psychiatry
Creators: Li, L., Niu, Z., Griffiths, M.D. and Mei, S.
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Date: 1 November 2021
Volume: 12
ISSN: 1664-0640
Identifiers:
NumberType
10.3389/fpsyt.2021.761519DOI
1484786Other
Rights: Copyright © 2021 Li, Niu, Griffiths and Mei. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) and the copyright owner(s) are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms.
Divisions: Schools > School of Social Sciences
Record created by: Laura Ward
Date Added: 02 Nov 2021 16:08
Last Modified: 02 Nov 2021 16:08
URI: http://irep.ntu.ac.uk/id/eprint/44579

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