The two-child limit for benefits in the Supreme Court: implications for public health

Machin, R. ORCID: 0000-0003-2296-2123, 2021. The two-child limit for benefits in the Supreme Court: implications for public health. Perspectives in Public Health. ISSN 1757-9139

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Abstract

The last 10 years has been a remarkable period for the UK social security system. The most significant changes in welfare provision since the inception of the welfare state have resulted in a reduction in social security spending of over £30 billion. One of the most controversial elements of the government’s programme of welfare reform is the two-child limit. This policy has returned to the fore following a recent Supreme Court judgement,1 where the Court was asked to decide if the financial restrictions imposed by the two-child limit are compatible with rights under the European Convention on Human Rights. This commentary analyses the impact of the two-child limit, the consequences of the Supreme Court decision, and the ways in which social security is a significant public health concern.

Item Type: Journal article
Publication Title: Perspectives in Public Health
Creators: Machin, R.
Publisher: SAGE Publications
Date: 25 October 2021
ISSN: 1757-9139
Identifiers:
NumberType
10.1177/17579139211054117DOI
34693820PubMed ID
1484375Other
Rights: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits any use, reproduction and distribution of the work without further permission provided the original work is attributed as specified on the SAGE and Open Access pages (https://us.sagepub.com/en-us/nam/open-access-at-sage).
Divisions: Schools > School of Social Sciences
Record created by: Linda Sullivan
Date Added: 04 Nov 2021 11:18
Last Modified: 04 Nov 2021 11:18
URI: http://irep.ntu.ac.uk/id/eprint/44613

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