The occurrence and benefits of postconflict bystander affiliation in wild Barbary macaques, Macaca sylvanus

McFarland, R. ORCID: 0000-0001-8245-9269 and Majolo, B., 2012. The occurrence and benefits of postconflict bystander affiliation in wild Barbary macaques, Macaca sylvanus. Animal Behaviour, 84 (3), pp. 583-591. ISSN 0003-3472

[img]
Preview
Text
1492507_McFarland.pdf - Post-print

Download (325kB) | Preview

Abstract

The majority of studies investigating conflict management in animal societies have focused on the role of reconciliation in mediating the costs of aggression. The function of bystander affiliation (i.e. the selective attraction between an opponent and a bystander in the minutes immediately following aggression) is less well understood. We examined, in wild Barbary macaques, four potential functions of bystander affiliation with the victim of aggression: (1) bystander-initiated affiliation to reduce the victim's postconflict (PC) anxiety (i.e. ‘consolation’), (2) victim-initiated affiliation (i.e. ‘solicited consolation’), (3) victim- and bystander-initiated affiliation to avert redirected aggression (i.e. self-protection), and (4) bystander-initiated affiliation to exploit grooming from the victim. We found partial support for the consolation function as bystander-initiated affiliation occurred more frequently between high-quality social partners but had no effect on the victim's PC anxiety. In support of the solicited-consolation function, victim-initiated affiliation occurred more frequently between high-quality social partners and also caused a reduction in the victim's PC anxiety. These findings suggest that solicited consolation may substitute for the stress alleviation role of reconciliation. We found no support for a self-protective function as neither the bystander's nor the victim's risk of receiving PC aggression was reduced following bystander affiliation with the victim. Finally, bystanders received significantly more PC grooming than victims, suggesting that grooming exploitation of the victim may drive the bystander's PC behaviour. Our results indicate that bystander affiliation has different functions and benefits for the victim of aggression and the bystander, and highlights the importance of considering which individual initiates this behaviour.

Item Type: Journal article
Publication Title: Animal Behaviour
Creators: McFarland, R. and Majolo, B.
Publisher: Elsevier BV
Date: September 2012
Volume: 84
Number: 3
ISSN: 0003-3472
Identifiers:
NumberType
10.1016/j.anbehav.2012.06.010DOI
1492507Other
Divisions: Schools > School of Social Sciences
Record created by: Laura Ward
Date Added: 16 Nov 2021 11:54
Last Modified: 16 Nov 2021 11:54
URI: http://irep.ntu.ac.uk/id/eprint/44814

Actions (login required)

Edit View Edit View

Views

Views per month over past year

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year