Reconciliation and the costs of aggression in wild Barbary macaques (Macaca sylvanus): a test of the integrated hypothesis

McFarland, R. ORCID: 0000-0001-8245-9269 and Majolo, B., 2011. Reconciliation and the costs of aggression in wild Barbary macaques (Macaca sylvanus): a test of the integrated hypothesis. Ethology, 117 (10), pp. 928-937. ISSN 0179-1613

[img]
Preview
Text
1492531_McFarland.pdf - Post-print

Download (179kB) | Preview

Abstract

The ‘integrated hypothesis’ predicts that reconciliation (the post-conflict friendly interaction between former opponents observed in various group-living species) functions to reduce anxiety and the risk of aggression from the former opponent or a bystander in the aftermath of a conflict. It also predicts that relationship quality between opponents affects the occurrence of reconciliation and modulates the anxious response of the opponents after a conflict. Because of the asymmetric nature of aggressive interactions, the cost of aggression is likely to differ between the victim and the aggressor. The aim of this study was to test the predictions of the ‘integrated hypothesis’ independently for the victim and the aggressor of a conflict. We collected data on two wild groups of Barbary macaques. This study represents, to our knowledge, the first systematic test of the integrated hypothesis on wild, non-provisioned animals. Victims of aggression were at a greater risk of receiving aggression from the former opponent or a bystander after a conflict and showed elevated anxiety. We found no such costs for the aggressor. Reconciliation reduced anxiety in the victim but did not reduce their risk of receiving aggression. Finally, relationship quality affected the occurrence of reconciliation but did not modulate post-conflict anxiety. The results of our study show that the costs of aggression are asymmetrically distributed between the victim and the aggressor. Such differences are likely to lead to different social tactics used by the victim and the aggressor in the aftermath of a conflict.

Item Type: Journal article
Publication Title: Ethology
Creators: McFarland, R. and Majolo, B.
Publisher: Wiley
Date: October 2011
Volume: 117
Number: 10
ISSN: 0179-1613
Identifiers:
NumberType
10.1111/j.1439-0310.2011.01948.xDOI
1492531Other
Rights: This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: McFarland, R., & Majolo, B. (2011). Reconciliation and the costs of aggression in wild Barbary macaques (Macaca sylvanus): a test of the integrated hypothesis. Ethology, 117(10), 928-937, which has been published in final form at https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1439-0310.2011.01948.x This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Use of Self-Archived Versions. This article may not be enhanced, enriched or otherwise transformed into a derivative work, without express permission from Wiley or by statutory rights under applicable legislation. Copyright notices must not be removed, obscured or modified. The article must be linked to Wiley’s version of record on Wiley Online Library and any embedding, framing or otherwise making available the article or pages thereof by third parties from platforms, services and websites other than Wiley Online Library must be prohibited.
Divisions: Schools > School of Social Sciences
Record created by: Laura Ward
Date Added: 16 Nov 2021 14:25
Last Modified: 16 Nov 2021 14:25
URI: http://irep.ntu.ac.uk/id/eprint/44818

Actions (login required)

Edit View Edit View

Views

Views per month over past year

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year