Gut-derived endotoxin and telomere length attrition in adults with and without type 2 diabetes

Al-Daghri, N.M., Abdi, S., Sabico, S., Alnaami, A.M., Wani, K.A., Ansari, M.G.A., Khattak, M.N.K., Khan, N., Tripathi, G., Chrousos, G.P. and McTernan, P.G. ORCID: 0000-0001-9023-0261, 2021. Gut-derived endotoxin and telomere length attrition in adults with and without type 2 diabetes. Biomolecules, 11 (11): 1693. ISSN 2218-273X

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Abstract

Premature aging, as denoted by a reduced telomere length (TL), has been observed in several chronic inflammatory diseases, such as obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). However, no study to date has addressed the potential inflammatory influence of the gut-derived Gram-negative bacterial fragments lipopolysaccharide, also referred to as endotoxin, and its influence on TL in low-grade inflammatory states such as type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). The current study therefore investigated the influence of endotoxin and inflammatory factors on telomere length (TL) in adults with (T2DM: n = 387) and without (non-diabetic (ND) controls: n = 417) obesity and T2DM. Anthropometric characteristics were taken, and fasted blood samples were used to measure biomarkers, TL, and endotoxin. The findings from this study highlighted across all participants that circulating endotoxin (r = −0.17, p = 0.01) was inversely associated with TL, noting that endotoxin and triglycerides predicted 18% of the variance perceived in TL (p < 0.001). Further stratification of the participants according to T2DM status and sex highlighted that endotoxin significantly predicted 19% of the variance denoted in TL among male T2DM participants (p = 0.007), where TL was notably influenced. The influence on TL was not observed to be impacted by anti-T2DM medications, statins, or anti-hypertensive therapies. Taken together, these results show that TL attrition was inversely associated with circulating endotoxin levels independent of the presence of T2DM and other cardiometabolic factors, suggesting that low-grade chronic inflammation may trigger premature biological aging. The findings further highlight the clinical relevance of mitigating the levels of circulating endotoxin (e.g., manipulation of gut microbiome) not only for the prevention of chronic diseases but also to promote healthy aging.

Item Type: Journal article
Alternative Title: Relevance of endotoxin on telomere attrition in type 2 diabetes
Description: In Biomolecules Special Issue "Aging and Aging-Associated Diseases: from Molecular Mechanisms to Therapies Strategies"
Publication Title: Biomolecules
Creators: Al-Daghri, N.M., Abdi, S., Sabico, S., Alnaami, A.M., Wani, K.A., Ansari, M.G.A., Khattak, M.N.K., Khan, N., Tripathi, G., Chrousos, G.P. and McTernan, P.G.
Publisher: MDPI AG
Date: 14 November 2021
Volume: 11
Number: 11
ISSN: 2218-273X
Identifiers:
NumberType
10.3390/biom11111693DOI
1499249Other
Rights: Copyright: © 2021 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).
Divisions: Schools > School of Science and Technology
Record created by: Linda Sullivan
Date Added: 29 Nov 2021 11:15
Last Modified: 29 Nov 2021 11:15
URI: http://irep.ntu.ac.uk/id/eprint/44978

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