Starving your performance? Reduced pre-exercise hunger increases resistance exercise performance

Naharudin, M.N., Yusof, A., Clayton, D.J. ORCID: 0000-0001-5481-0891 and James, L.J., 2021. Starving your performance? Reduced pre-exercise hunger increases resistance exercise performance. International Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance. ISSN 1555-0265

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Abstract

Background: Pre-exercise food intake enhances exercise performance due, in part, to the provision of exogenous carbohydrate. Food intake also suppresses hunger, but the specific influence of hunger on exercise performance has not been investigated. This study aimed to manipulate hunger by altering pre-exercise meal viscosity to examine whether hunger influences performance.

Methods: Sixteen resistance-trained males completed 2 experimental trials ingesting either high viscosity semisolid (SEM) and low viscosity liquid (LIQ) carbohydrate-containing meals 2 hours before performing 4 sets of back squat (85 [22] kg) and bench press (68 [13] kg) to failure at 90% 10-repetition maximum. Subjective hunger/fullness as well as plasma concentrations of glucose, insulin, ghrelin, and peptide tyrosine–tyrosine were measured before and periodically after the meal. Repetitions completed in sets were used to determine exercise performance.

Results: This study demonstrates that exercise performance in back squat was increased in the SEM trial concomitant to a reduction in hunger. Therefore, this study provides novel data that suggest that exercise performance might be influenced by hunger, at least for resistance exercise.

Item Type: Journal article
Publication Title: International Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance
Creators: Naharudin, M.N., Yusof, A., Clayton, D.J. and James, L.J.
Publisher: Human Kinetics
Date: 6 December 2021
ISSN: 1555-0265
Identifiers:
NumberType
10.1123/ijspp.2021-0166DOI
1501278Other
Rights: Accepted author manuscript version reprinted, by permission, from International Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance, [2021, https://doi.org/10.1123/ijspp.2021-0166. © Human Kinetics, Inc.
Divisions: Schools > School of Science and Technology
Record created by: Linda Sullivan
Date Added: 08 Dec 2021 08:53
Last Modified: 08 Dec 2021 08:53
URI: http://irep.ntu.ac.uk/id/eprint/45067

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