Perceptions underlying addictive technology use patterns: insights for cognitive-behavioural therapy

Fernandez-Lopez, O., Romo, L., Kern, L., Rousseau, A., Graziani, P., Rochat, L., Achab, S., Zullino, D., Landrø, N.I., Zacarés, J.J., Serra, E., Mariano Chóliz, M., Pontes, H.M., Griffiths, M.D. ORCID: 0000-0001-8880-6524 and Kuss, D.J. ORCID: 0000-0001-8917-782X, 2022. Perceptions underlying addictive technology use patterns: insights for cognitive-behavioural therapy. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 19 (1): 544. ISSN 1661-7827

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Abstract

Cognitive-Behavioural Therapy (CBT) is considered the ‘gold standard’ in the treatment of addictive disorders related to excessive technology use. However, the cognitive components of problematic internet use are not yet well-known. The aim of the present study was to explore the cognitive components, that according to problematic users, can lead to potential internet addiction. A total of 854 European adults completed an online survey using a mixed-methods design. Internet problems and attachment styles were assessed, prevalence rates estimated, correlations, chi-squared automatic interaction detection, and content analysis were performed. Self-reported addictions to social networking, internet, and gaming had a prevalence between 1.2% (gaming) to 2.7% (social networking). Self-perception of the addiction problem and preoccupied attachment style were discriminative factors for internet addiction. In an analysis of qualitative responses from self-identified compulsive internet users, a sense of not belonging and feeling of disconnection during life events were perceived as causes for internet addiction. The development depended on a cycle of mixed feelings associated with negative thoughts, compensated by a positive online identity. The severity of this behaviour pattern produced significant impairment in various areas of the participants’ functioning, suggesting a possible addiction problem. It is suggested that health professionals administering CBT should target unhealthy preoccupations and monitor mixed feelings and thoughts related to internet use to support coping with cognitive distortions.

Item Type: Journal article
Publication Title: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
Creators: Fernandez-Lopez, O., Romo, L., Kern, L., Rousseau, A., Graziani, P., Rochat, L., Achab, S., Zullino, D., Landrø, N.I., Zacarés, J.J., Serra, E., Mariano Chóliz, M., Pontes, H.M., Griffiths, M.D. and Kuss, D.J.
Publisher: MDPI
Date: 4 January 2022
Volume: 19
Number: 1
ISSN: 1661-7827
Identifiers:
NumberType
10.3390/ijerph19010544DOI
1505638Other
Rights: © 2022 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).
Divisions: Schools > School of Social Sciences
Record created by: Laura Ward
Date Added: 06 Jan 2022 11:00
Last Modified: 20 Jan 2022 09:53
URI: http://irep.ntu.ac.uk/id/eprint/45178

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