A longitudinal study of the effects of problematic smartphone use on social functioning among people with schizophrenia: Mediating roles for sleep quality and self-stigma

Chang, K.-C., Chang, Y.-H., Yen, C.-F., Chen, J.-S., Chen, P.-J., Lin, C.-Y., Griffiths, M.D. ORCID: 0000-0001-8880-6524, Potenza, M.N. and Pakpour, A.H., 2022. A longitudinal study of the effects of problematic smartphone use on social functioning among people with schizophrenia: Mediating roles for sleep quality and self-stigma. Journal of Behavioral Addictions. ISSN 2062-5871

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Abstract

Background and aims: Individuals with schizophrenia may often experience poor sleep, self-stigma, impaired social functions, and problematic smartphone use. However, the temporal relationships between these factors have not been investigated. The present study used a longitudinal design to examine potential mediating roles of poor sleep and self-stigma in associations between problematic smartphone use and impaired social functions among individuals with schizophrenia.

Methods: From April 2019 to August 2021, 193 individuals with schizophrenia (mean [SD] age = 41.34 [9.01] years; 88 [45.6%] males) were recruited and asked to complete three psychometric scales: the Smartphone Application-Based Addiction Scale to assess problematic smartphone use; the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index to assess sleep quality; and the Self-Stigma Scale-Short Scale to assess self-stigma. Social functioning was evaluated by a psychiatrist using the Personal and Social Performance Scale. All measures were assessed five times (one baseline and four follow-ups) at three-month intervals between assessments.

Results: General estimating equations found that problematic smartphone use (coefficient = −0.096, SE = 0.021; P < 0.001), sleep quality (coefficient = −0.134, SE = 0.038; P < 0.001), and self-stigma (coefficient = −0.612, SE = 0.192; P = 0.001) were significant statistical predictors for social functioning. Moreover, sleep quality and self-stigma mediated associations between problematic smartphone use and social functioning.

Conclusion: Problematic smartphone use appears to impact social functioning longitudinally among individuals with schizophrenia via poor sleep and self-stigma concerns. Interventions aimed at reducing problematic smartphone use, improving sleep, and addressing self-stigma may help improve social functioning among individuals with schizophrenia.

Item Type: Journal article
Publication Title: Journal of Behavioral Addictions
Creators: Chang, K.-C., Chang, Y.-H., Yen, C.-F., Chen, J.-S., Chen, P.-J., Lin, C.-Y., Griffiths, M.D., Potenza, M.N. and Pakpour, A.H.
Publisher: Akademiai Kiado Zrt.
Date: 7 April 2022
ISSN: 2062-5871
Identifiers:
NumberType
10.1556/2006.2022.00012DOI
1536568Other
Rights: © 2022 The Author(s). This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium for non-commercial purposes, provided the original author and source are credited, a link to the CC License is provided, and changes – if any – are indicated.
Divisions: Schools > School of Social Sciences
Record created by: Laura Ward
Date Added: 12 Apr 2022 08:16
Last Modified: 12 Apr 2022 08:16
URI: http://irep.ntu.ac.uk/id/eprint/46099

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