Resilience level and its relationship with hypochondriasis in nurses working in COVID-19 reference hospitals

Yusefi, A.R., Daneshi, S., Davarani, E.R., Nikmanesh, P., Mehralian, G. ORCID: 0000-0002-3510-4614 and Bastani, P., 2021. Resilience level and its relationship with hypochondriasis in nurses working in COVID-19 reference hospitals. BMC Nursing, 20: 219.

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Abstract

Introduction: A new coronavirus, called COVID-19, is an acute respiratory disease, which may arouse many psychological disorders since there is no specialized knowledge about it. The present study aimed to investigate the level of resilience and its relationship with hypochondriasis in nurses working in a COVID-19 reference hospital in south of Iran.

Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted in 2020, in which 312 nurses participated using the census method. Data collection tools were the Conker-Davidson standard resilience scale (CD-RISC) and the Evans Hypoglycaemia Awareness Questionnaire. Data were analyzed using t-test, ANOVA, Pearson correlation coefficient, and multiple linear regression using SPSS software version 23.

Results: The mean scores of resilience and hypochondriasis were 72.38 ± 7.11 and 49.75 ± 8.13, respectively, indicating the moderate level of these two variables among nurses. Hypochondriasis in 18.91, 61.22, and 1.28% of the nurses was mild, moderate, and severe, respectively. There was a significant negative correlation between resilience and hypochondriasis (r = − 0.214 and P < 0.001). In this regard, control (P < 0.001), positive acceptance of change (P < 0.001), spiritual effects (P = 0.001), trust in individual instincts (P = 0.001), and perception of competence (P = 0.002) were detected as the predictors of nurses’ hypochondriasis.

Conclusion: The nurses had moderate levels of resilience and hypochondriasis. Promoting knowledge about COVID-19and increasing information on how to protect oneself and others against the disease along with supportive packages from their managers are thus recommended.

Item Type: Journal article
Publication Title: BMC Nursing
Creators: Yusefi, A.R., Daneshi, S., Davarani, E.R., Nikmanesh, P., Mehralian, G. and Bastani, P.
Publisher: Springer
Date: 2021
Volume: 20
Identifiers:
NumberType
10.1186/s12912-021-00730-zDOI
1544441Other
Rights: © the author(s) 2021. This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons licence, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article's Creative Commons licence, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article's Creative Commons licence and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this licence, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated in a credit line to the data.
Divisions: Schools > Nottingham Business School
Record created by: Jonathan Gallacher
Date Added: 09 May 2022 08:34
Last Modified: 09 May 2022 08:34
URI: http://irep.ntu.ac.uk/id/eprint/46281

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