Associations between vaccination and quality of life among Taiwan general population: a comparison between COVID-19 vaccines and flu vaccines

Lin, C.-Y., Fan, C.-W., Ahorsu, D.K., Lin, Y.C., Weng, H.-C. and Griffiths, M.D. ORCID: 0000-0001-8880-6524, 2022. Associations between vaccination and quality of life among Taiwan general population: a comparison between COVID-19 vaccines and flu vaccines. Human Vaccines and Immunotherapeutics. ISSN 2164-5515

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Abstract

The COVID-19 pandemic has profoundly impacted lives worldwide and has led to global vaccination against COVID-19. However, there are concerns about the adverse effects of such vaccines on individuals’ health. Therefore, it is important to investigate the association between vaccination and holistic health outcome (i.e., quality of life [QoL]). The present study analyzed data from the Taiwan Social Change Survey (TSCS), a survey conducted utilizing stratified random sampling. More specifically, data (N = 1425; 47.44% males; mean age = 50.58 y) on their vaccinations (including COVID-19 and flu vaccines) and QoL (using the Short-Form 12) were used. Participants were separated into two age subgroups for analyses (those aged below 50 y, and those 50 y or above). For participants aged below 50 y, those who received COVID-19 vaccine and those who received both COVID-19 and flu vaccines had significantly better physical QoL than those who did not receive any vaccination. Mental QoL was not significantly associated with vaccinations for participants aged below 50 y. Moreover, neither mental nor physical QoL was significantly associated with vaccinations for those aged 50 y or above. The present study showed that not having COVID-19 and flu vaccinations is associated with poor QoL. This finding should be disseminated to the public to help aid vaccination promotion.

Item Type: Journal article
Publication Title: Human Vaccines and Immunotherapeutics
Creators: Lin, C.-Y., Fan, C.-W., Ahorsu, D.K., Lin, Y.C., Weng, H.-C. and Griffiths, M.D.
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
Date: 9 June 2022
ISSN: 2164-5515
Identifiers:
NumberType
10.1080/21645515.2022.2079344DOI
1552432Other
Rights: © 2022 the author(s). Published with license by Taylor & Francis Group, LLC. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/), which permits non-commercial re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited, and is not altered, transformed, or built upon in any way.
Divisions: Schools > School of Social Sciences
Record created by: Jonathan Gallacher
Date Added: 10 Jun 2022 14:05
Last Modified: 10 Jun 2022 14:05
URI: http://irep.ntu.ac.uk/id/eprint/46439

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