Realistic evaluation and the 5Is: a systematic approach for evaluating security interventions

Newton, A. ORCID: 0000-0002-2491-8401, 2022. Realistic evaluation and the 5Is: a systematic approach for evaluating security interventions. In: M. Gill, ed., The handbook of security. 3rd ed. Cham, Switzerland: Palgrave Macmillan, pp. 517-538. ISBN 9783030917340

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Abstract

This chapter advocates for a greater uptake of two underused approached in the security field, realistic evaluation and the 5Is framework, to support more robust and systematic approaches to evaluating security interventions. It contends that a combination of these two complimentary approaches affords a methodical approach to support the design of security interventions, enables a systematic approach for the evaluation of security interventions, offers a greater understanding by the mechanisms which a security intervention has or has not worked in a particular setting or place, facilitates replication and future adaption of security interventions in different contexts, and provides a user-friendly structure for disseminating and communicating the evaluation results of interventions to security practitioners. This chapter examines the strengths and limitations of each approach, the merits of combining the two, and uses a hypothetical scenario to guide the reader through how to carry out a combined realistic evaluation and 5Is evaluation of a security intervention.

Item Type: Chapter in book
Creators: Newton, A.
Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan
Place of Publication: Cham, Switzerland
Date: 2022
ISBN: 9783030917340
Identifiers:
NumberType
10.1007/978-3-030-91735-7_24DOI
1561807Other
Divisions: Schools > School of Social Sciences
Record created by: Laura Ward
Date Added: 30 Jun 2022 16:07
Last Modified: 30 Jun 2022 16:07
URI: http://irep.ntu.ac.uk/id/eprint/46531

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