Immigration and the crime-drop: an examination of victimisation trends, risk and incidence across England and Wales over time

Nomikos, E., 2022. Immigration and the crime-drop: an examination of victimisation trends, risk and incidence across England and Wales over time. PhD, Nottingham Trent University.

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Abstract

Research relating to the crime-drop has gained momentum in recent years, with various theoretical perspectives arguing on the contribution, or lack thereof, of factors which affected the decline in crime. Most research has focused on either property crime and related theories, or incorporated crime as a broader definition, lacking a focused breakdown. In England and Wales, there is a significant lack of studies in relation to the crime-drop and consequently, the empirical testing of the various theories attempting to account for it. The studies comprising the thesis expand the limited knowledge and contributes to three separate columns of literature: a) the assault crime-drop, b) the immigration and crime nexus, and c) the role of race and ethnicity in victimisation. The thesis addresses each pillar from a victimisation perspective, using the most established victimisation survey of England and Wales, and relevant Census and Immigration data. The thesis incorporates advanced statistical analysis methods, making it comparable to past literature. The findings indicate that i) the assault crime-drop has been more equitable across ethnicity than it is for socioeconomic groups. ii) The levels of unprecedented immigration influxes in the UK coincide with the unprecedented drops in assault victimisation. iii) A paradox between the levels of deprivation in multicultural areas and a lower-than-expected victimisation risk when compared to similarly deprived but less non-multicultural areas identified in other English-speaking countries are found for England and Wales. The findings have important implications for future research, as well as for the consideration of social policymakers.

Item Type: Thesis
Creators: Nomikos, E.
Date: May 2022
Rights: This work is the intellectual property of the author. You may copy up to 5% of this work for private study, or personal, non-commercial research. Any re-use of the information contained within this document should be fully referenced, quoting the author, title, university, degree level and pagination. Queries or requests for any other use, or if a more substantial copy is required, should be directed in the owner(s) of the Intellectual Property Rights.
Divisions: Schools > School of Social Sciences
Record created by: Linda Sullivan
Date Added: 28 Jul 2022 13:01
Last Modified: 28 Jul 2022 13:01
URI: http://irep.ntu.ac.uk/id/eprint/46764

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