Which online learning resources do undergraduate economics students’ value and does their use improve academic attainment? A comparison and revealed preferences from before and during the Covid pandemic

Barile, L., Elliott, C. and McCann, M. ORCID: 0000-0002-8584-2156, 2022. Which online learning resources do undergraduate economics students’ value and does their use improve academic attainment? A comparison and revealed preferences from before and during the Covid pandemic. International Review of Economics Education: 100253. ISSN 1477-3880

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Abstract

The rapid shift to online learning during the Covid-19 pandemic led to widespread migration to online / blended delivery across UK Higher Education. This has prompted renewed interest in identifying the features of virtual learning environments (VLEs) which students value and are most helpful in academic development and attainment. Using the experience of delivery on an undergraduate module both before and after the introduction of an online delivery model, we use a revealed preference framework to analyse the influence of cognitive load on the value students attach to VLE features in combination with other learning resources. We also use regression analysis to examine which learning resources are crucial to attainment. Our findings suggests that students avoid cognitive overload by being selective in their use of learning resources. They showed a greater preference for both familiar and passive learning resources like lectures, lecture recordings and seminars in both learning environments. Students exhibited a lower preference for active VLE features - multiple-choice quizzes, open-ended questions and discussion forums. Nonetheless, use of open-ended questions along with lecture recordings and lecture slides had a significantly positive impact on academic attainment in the online learning environment. This supports instrumentalism in the use of these resources. Students were more selective in developing deeper understanding using online open-ended questions. Our results imply that module designers need to accept that such resources will be used more selectively. However, they should still be provided to encourage active, deeper learning.

Item Type: Journal article
Publication Title: International Review of Economics Education
Creators: Barile, L., Elliott, C. and McCann, M.
Publisher: Elsevier BV
Date: 26 September 2022
ISSN: 1477-3880
Identifiers:
NumberType
10.1016/j.iree.2022.100253DOI
1606313Other
Divisions: Schools > Nottingham Business School
Record created by: Laura Ward
Date Added: 05 Oct 2022 09:18
Last Modified: 05 Oct 2022 09:18
URI: https://irep.ntu.ac.uk/id/eprint/47214

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