Comparison of the biotypes of Yersinia enterocolitica isolated from pigs, cattle and sheep at slaughter and from humans with yersiniosis in Great Britain during 1999-2000

McNally, A. ORCID: 0000-0002-3099-630X, Cheasty, T., Fearnley, C., Dalziel, R.W., Paiba, G.A., Manning, G. and Newell, D.G., 2004. Comparison of the biotypes of Yersinia enterocolitica isolated from pigs, cattle and sheep at slaughter and from humans with yersiniosis in Great Britain during 1999-2000. Letters in Applied Microbiology, 39 (1), pp. 103-108.

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Abstract

Aims: To investigate the relationship between livestock carriage of Yersinia enterocolitica and human disease. The biotypes/serotypes of strains recovered from the faeces of pigs, cattle and sheep at slaughter during a national survey in Great Britain in 1999-2000, were compared with those of strains isolated from human cases of yersiniosis during the same period. Methods and Results: The faecal carriage of Y. enterocolitica by cattle, sheep and pigs at slaughter was 6.3, 10.7 and 26.1%, respectively. Yersinia enterocolitica biotype (BT) 1a was the most frequently isolated biotype from livestock (58%) and was the predominant biotype (53%) isolated from human cases over the same period. The main recognized pathogenic Y. enterocolitica biotype isolated from livestock was BT3 (O:5,27) (35% of sheep, 22% of pigs and 4% of cattle) but this biotype was not detected in any of the human isolates investigated. The major pathogenic biotypes of strains isolated from humans were BT3 (O:9) (24%) and BT4 (O:3) (19%) whereas of the veterinary isolates investigated, only pigs (11%) carried BT3 (O:9) strains. Conclusions: Because of significant overlaps in phenotypes of the veterinary and human strains it is not possible to comment on the correlation between host and pathogenicity, especially of biotype 1a. Significance and Impact of the Study: The data suggest that further investigations using methods with greater discriminatory power are required. However the data also suggests that pigs may be the primary reservoir for human pathogenic Y. enterocolitica infection.

Item Type: Journal article
Publication Title: Letters in Applied Microbiology
Creators: McNally, A., Cheasty, T., Fearnley, C., Dalziel, R.W., Paiba, G.A., Manning, G. and Newell, D.G.
Publisher: Blackwell Publishing
Date: 2004
Volume: 39
Number: 1
Identifiers:
NumberType
10.1111/j.1472-765X.2004.01548.xDOI
Rights: © Blackwell Publishing 2004. The definitive version is available at www.blackwell-synergy.com.
Divisions: Schools > School of Science and Technology
Depositing User: EPrints Services
Date Added: 09 Oct 2015 10:01
Last Modified: 09 Jun 2017 13:16
URI: http://irep.ntu.ac.uk/id/eprint/6341

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