Effect of within-session breaks in play on responsible gambling behaviour during sustained monetary losses

Parke, A., Dickinson, P., O'Hare, L. ORCID: 0000-0003-0331-3646, Wilson, L., Westerman-Hughes, G. and Gerling, K., 2019. Effect of within-session breaks in play on responsible gambling behaviour during sustained monetary losses. Current Psychology. ISSN 1046-1310

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Abstract

Rapid, continuous gambling formats are associated with higher risks for gambling-related harm in terms of excessive monetary and time expenditure. The current study investigated the effect on gambling response latency and persistence, of a new form of within-game intervention that required players to actively engage in response inhibition via monitoring for stop signals. Seventy-four experienced electronic gaming machine gamblers, with a mean age of 35.28 years, were recruited to participate in a rapid, continuous gambling task where real money could be won and lost. Participants were randomly allocated to either the control condition where no intervention was presented, or either a condition with a passive three minute break in play or a condition with a three minute intervention that required participants to engage in response inhibition. Although there was no main effect for experimental condition on gambling persistence, both interventions were effective in elevating response latency during a period of sustained losses. It was concluded that within-game interventions that create an enforced break in play are effective in increasing response latency between bets during periods of sustained losses. Furthermore, within-game interventions that require active involvement appear to be more effective in increasing response latency than standard, passive breaks in play.

Item Type: Journal article
Publication Title: Current Psychology
Creators: Parke, A., Dickinson, P., O'Hare, L., Wilson, L., Westerman-Hughes, G. and Gerling, K.
Publisher: Springer
Date: 12 December 2019
ISSN: 1046-1310
Identifiers:
NumberType
10.1007/s12144-019-00567-5DOI
1372376Other
Rights: This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons licence, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article's Creative Commons licence, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article's Creative Commons licence and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this licence, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.
Divisions: Schools > School of Social Sciences
Record created by: Linda Sullivan
Date Added: 06 Oct 2020 13:33
Last Modified: 31 May 2021 15:13
URI: http://irep.ntu.ac.uk/id/eprint/41180

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